Delaware County, Indiana

Discover Delaware County - an east central Indiana community of opportunity

Contact Us

Jason Rogers,
HSEMA/EMS Director

In this Department

More Information

Flood Safety

 

If your business or home is threatened by flooding, contact the Delaware County Emergency Management Agency at 747-7719 for sand bag distribution locations. After business hours call the Delaware County Dispatch Center 747-7878.
 
fldpics

Devastating floods occur throughout the United States every year. Ninety percent of all presidential disaster declarations involve flooding. While most floods can not be prevented, there are some simple steps you can take to protect your life and property.

Start by knowing some of the terms associated with flooding and knowing your flood risks. Also have a disaster supply kit and a battery operated NOAA Weather Radio.

Another contributing factor to flooding is the amount of impervious area (i.e. parking lots, roads). About 10 % of the United States is impervious area. Fields and woodlands that once slowed and absorbed rain waters are now parking lots and roadways which allow heavy rains to drain into storm drains and sewers and eventually creeks and rivers.

Prepare yourself in advance! When a Watch is issued, and you live near an area known to flood, start taking action, don't wait! Move to higher ground. Purchase a NOAA Weather Radio and monitor it for severe weather events.


If you are driving, and you come to an area covered by flood waters,
 "Turn Around, Don't Drown®"
dontdrown
    • Never attempt to drive through a flood that you couldn't walk through and be aware that water hides dips in the road. Worse still, there may be no road at all under the water. Flooding can wash away the entire road surface and a significant amount of ground beneath.

    • Just six inches of water will reach the bottom of most passenger cars; this depth can cause loss of control or possible stalling as water is sucked into the exhaust or washes into the air intake.

    • If negotiating a flooded section of road, drive in the middle where the water will be at its shallowest.

    •  Consider other drivers - pass through flooded sections one car at a time, don't drive through water against approaching vehicles.

    •  Many cars will start to float in as little as one foot of water - this can be extremely dangerous because as the wheels lose grip, you lose control.

    • Two feet of flowing water can sweep away most vehicles - including large four-wheel drive cars. Don't try driving through fast-moving water, for example approaching a flooded bridge - your car could easily be swept away


Familiarize yourself with these terms to help identify a flood hazard:

Flood Watch:
Flooding is possible. Tune in to NOAA Weather Radio, commercial radio, or television for information.

Flash Flood Watch:

Flash flooding is possible. Be prepared to move to higher ground; listen to NOAA Weather Radio, commercial radio, or television for information.

Flood Warning:
Flooding is occurring or will occur soon; if advised to evacuate, do so immediately.

Flash Flood Warning:
A flash flood is occurring; seek higher ground on foot immediately.


For more information on Floods and Flash Floods you can check out the following websites.

 


 
 

Flood Safety Tips

Know your flood risk. Be prepared to evacuate if your area is known to flood. Know your evacuation routes.
  • Keep your vehicle fueled.
  • Store drinking water in a safe place. Store food that requires little or no cooking or refrigeration.
  • Keep a disaster supply kit ready and accessible. Have first aid supplies, a NOAA Weather Radio, flashlights and extra batteries.
A Flash Flood is caused by intense heavy rains over a short amount of time and leaves more water than the ground can absorb. A Flood Watch means conditions are right for a flood to occur. A Flood Warning means flooding is occurring or imminent. Several factors contribute to flooding, intensity and duration. Topography, soil conditions, and ground cover also play important roles. Another contributing factor to flooding is the amount of impervious area (i.e. parking lots, roads). About 10 % of the United States is impervious area. Fields and woodlands that once slowed and absorbed rain waters are now parking lots and roadways which allow heavy rains to drain into storm drains and sewers and eventually creeks and rivers.


 Except for heat related fatalities, more deaths occur from flooding than any other hazard. Why? Most people fail to realize the power of water. For example, six inches of fast-moving flood waters can sweep you off your feet. While the number of fatalities can vary dramatically with weather conditions from year to year, the national 30-year average for flood deaths is 127. That compares with a 30-year average of 73 deaths for lightning, 65 for tornadoes and 16 for hurricanes.

 National Weather Service data also shows:
%u2022 Nearly half of all flash flood fatalities are vehicle-related,
%u2022 The majority of victims are males, and
%u2022 Flood deaths affect all age groups.

Television and radio broadcast "Watches and Warnings" to broad areas. The local source for information pertaining to Delaware County is WLBC 104.1, WMDH 102.5 FM, and The Starpress (weather text alerts)

Before a flood occurs, elevate items such as outside air conditioning units, washer & dryer, any your hot water heater. Seal vents to prevent flooding. If flooding should occur at your location, immediately shut off your electricity at the circuit breakers. This will prevent short circuiting of electrical appliances. In many cases with minor flooding, the appliances can be cleaned and put back into use again. If the power was left on in a flood, you risk being electrocuted, along with expensive repairs to short circuit appliances. Protect your investments and know your flood risks. Again, knowing the terrain and history of flooding in your neighborhood is the best information. Purchase a NOAA Weather Radio and monitor it for severe weather events.

Your Homeowners Insurance may not cover floods, and you don't have to live in the floodplain to purchase it. Keep an inventory of your household items. This will help, should you have to file an insurance claim. A few simple steps now will help save your memories. Even in most severe floods, houses usually are not completely submerged. Hang photos a little higher, if flooding is a problem in your area. If you have photos/photo albums and mementos lying around, store them in a plastic storage container. If you usually have these items sitting out on display, have an empty plastic storage container readily available, in the event of a flood.  For personal protection  cover all cuts and open wounds to prevent infection during clean-up. Wear boots and rubber gloves at all times. In cases where splashing may occur, wear eye protection and a dust mask.

Flood Safety Tips  
Know your flood risk. Be prepared to evacuate if your area is known to flood. Know your evacuation routes. Keep your vehicle fueled. Store drinking water in a safe place. Store food that requires little or no cooking or refrigeration. Keep a disaster supply kit ready and accessible. Have first aid supplies, a NOAA Weather Radio, flashlights and extra batteries.